Is that rhetorical?

Do you know the best way to teach your child how to use rhetorical questions?

When a person asks a question, but does not expect a direct answer, or an answer at all, this is called a rhetorical question.

Many of the blog posts begin with a rhetorical questions, in this way they are used to draw the reader in and persuade them to keep reading. It is a very useful feature and wonderful for children to learn because it can improve their writing skills and storytelling ability.

We likely use them all the time in conversation, however we may not realise when we are saying a rhetorical question. Using a language feature in daily conversation is very different to having to teach it to our children, wouldn’t you agree? (This is also a rhetorical question in the form of a tag ending – it is asked to reinforce the previous statement it is attached too.)

In Short

  • A rhetorical question is used to make a point.
  • A rhetorical question is used to persuade people to continue reading or to buy into an idea.
  • A rhetorical question makes a point.
  • A rhetorical question doesn’t need an answer.
  • A rhetorical question makes people think about their own opinion or about particular topics.
  • A rhetorical question sometimes has such an obvious answer so there’s no need for a direct response.
  • An example is when someone responds informally: Are you serious?
  • Another example is: Can’t you do anything properly?

For those of you who asked to have this blog post, here are some useful videos too…

You can show your children to remind them what they have learnt in class from their teacher, and they are also useful for us parents who may need encouragement and better understanding when teaching at home.

Good Explanation
A little more fun for the movie lovers

Helpful for children wanting to include rhetorical questions in their writing:

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